The Importance of Generalization

Let’s say one day you decide you want to become physically healthier. So you get a personal trainer, but every time you get home you eat nothing but junk food. Would you expect to see or feel any results?

It’s the same with occupational therapy. Most kids get a few hours a week, or even as little as 30 to 45 minutes a week of OT. That’s less than 25% of the whole week, and even if progress is made in the clinic or in school, that doesn’t guarantee that it will carry over into their home life. That’s where the family comes in.

Generalization is the ultimate goal of pediatric OT: to meet their goals across all environments (clinic, home, school, and in the community). Here’s the best way families can support making progress more efficiently.

Trust the therapists, and collaborate with them. They truly want the best for you and your family. Ask for ideas and strategies from your child’s therapist, don’t just google. OT is not a one size fits all deal, and there’s not just one magic formula or recipe for each issue. Each child is different, each day is different, each hour, even each second. Life is flexible and unpredictable. It’s important to have more than one tool in your tool belt for backup.

Leave a Reply